Pic of the Week

robertsjohnson:

Many factories in third world countries have horrible working conditions that result in devastating losses. It’s a shame that people lost their life to an expense of a commodity. Many employees of this factory work long hours throughout the night with little to no pay. These workers must take these jobs to support their families. It’s a vicious cycle that never seems to stop because the workers of the recent burnt down factory are now working at the factory down the street working in the same kind of conditions.

Originally posted on Eideard:


Aftermath of a fire that killed dozens in a Bangladesh clothing factory
REUTERS/Andrew Biraj — click to enlarge

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Illegal Immigrants

robertsjohnson:

Education is one thing that illegal immigrants can definitely take advantage of in the U.S. I didn’t think it would be at the expense of American citizens losing out on opportunities to increase their chances of higher education. I government needs to change the policy how they fund schools by knowing the amount of students per school, not be the census. Another issue deals with the fact Obama wont support the fact that illegal’s should provide paperwork providing immigration status. I understand paper work is hard to hold on to but the government must come up with an easier way for immigrants to show identification because American citizens have and are required to hold identification information. This is leading American citizens to believe our government is treating illegal’s better than Americans. I’m trying to figure out, with all these benefits why would an illegal want to become an American citizen..

Originally posted on RENELAND:

Let me start by stating that I am not prejudice. My father was Mexican, therefor so am I. I am not prejudice regardless of that fact. Next let me say that I understand, empathize and don’t have issues with Mexicans who want to come to America. I also know that it is not easy to get visas and that the process needs to be fixed. Now let me say that I have major issues with illegal immigrants. I live in Phoenix. I also live in a mostly Hispanic neighborhood and school district. I am a strong supporter of SB1070.

I am personally affected by this in many ways. At the heart of this is my daughter. Public schools get funding for teachers, programs, after school activities, lunches etc for each district from the state. The state gets its funding from the federal government. The amount per district depends on…

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Police Seize 15 Assault Weapons From Suspected Illegal Immigrant

robertsjohnson:

This is unacceptable for an illegal immigrant to have possession of multiple assault rifles. Even though the guns weren’t illegal to own, they were being transported in the back of the individual’s car back to Mexico. This is a common practice in the drug trade and is a reason law enforcement cant stop their internal crackdown of illegal immigration. The individual should also not be able to go back to Mexico. I understand this would just increase the prison population and the cost of taxpayer’s money, but getting guns off the street is a main issue.

Originally posted on CBS Dallas / Fort Worth:

DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – A suspected illegal immigrant is in custody after police recovered 15 military-style assault weapons in his vehicle in Oak Cliff.

24-year old Jesus Gonzales was arrested during a traffic stop near Hampton and Brooklyn on Thursday. When Dallas police stopped Gonzales, a police report says the officer was given permission to search the car and found 15 assault rifles.

Police were first alerted to a suspicious vehicle parked in an alley in the area.

Agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement have put a detainer on Gonzales, meaning he will not be able to get out of jail on bond.

Due to the nature of the assault weapons, the case was referred to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF).

Andrew Young of the ATF noted that the weapons recovered by authorities are not in themselves illegal with a proper permit, but the legal status of Gonzales warranted the…

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Ethics and Issues in Deportation

robertsjohnson:

The number of illegal immigrants being deported back to their home countries increase every year and is costing the United States a lot of money. Deporting immigrants also splits families up sometimes leave kids without an adult figure. Immigrant families face tough decisions when they someone in their family get deported. For one, their family household income will decrease due to a member of the family being out of work. Second if an illegal immigrant gets deported and decides to re enter the U.S. they will then be committing a felony resulting in that individual having to append time in prison. Lastly parents will have to decide what they will do with their children, either leave the children with family, take them back to their home country or place the child in foster care. An immigrant shouldn’t have to worry about not seeing their family if their a hard working citizen.

Originally posted on Immigration Talk:

Checkpoint at the U.S.-Mexican Border in the rearview mirror. Photo Credit: Flicker username, “Jennoit”

Last year’s deportation statistics were record-breaking. During 2011, approximately 400,000 undocumented immigrants were deported (Record Number of Illegal Immigrants Deported in 2011). Like all immigrant populations, the people deported formed a heterogeneous group. While some were recent arrivals, others lived here for years and established families, potentially containing mixed-immigration statuses. Too frequently, the deportation of an undocumented immigrant means dividing families in ridiculous ways. Many times, it means that the citizens-by-birth children of undocumented parents are the only members of the family allowed to stay in the U.S. Separating children from their parents is issue enough by itself, but let’s take a moment to think about the ramifications of these divisions. What would you do if you were sent to your home country and your child was living in a foreign nation, potentially without the…

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ICE Scaling Back Cooperation of 287(g) Program That Helps State Law Enforcement Identify Illegal Immigrants That Commit Felonies

robertsjohnson:

There are many illegal immigrants in this country not obtaining an education and having past history with law enforcements. Having a more efficient and effective database for law enforcement agents is key to detect people living in the United States illegally. Secure Communities are going in the right direction allowing federal officers access to finger prints from the FBI, local police and immigration databases. This information is obtained from immigrants that have had criminal chargers and are obtained behind bars. However critics of Secure Communities believe that the Latino race is being treated unfairly from the local police who are granted permission from federal officers to check individual’s immigration status without being under arrest. Immigrants who are criminals don’t deserve to stay in America on the dimes of U.S. taxpayers but people should not be discriminated by the color of their skin. I believe its wrong for law enforcement to stop individuals only on the basis of identification verification, but if you commit a crime or break the law an officer should be able to ask for a person to present some kind of identification.

Originally posted on Scotty Starnes's Blog:

Must stop the deportation of undocumented Democrats no matter how dangerous they are to American society.

RALEIGH — Federal officials are scaling back a program that enlists the aid of local police and sheriff’s offices to identify people who are in the country illegally, in favor of a national program that uses fingerprints collected by the FBI.

U.S. Immigrations Customs and Enforcement officials say the so-called 287(g) program that includes Wake County will continue at least until the end of the year. But ICE says the program is under review, and that it will no longer train local police under the program or give them the authority to question, investigate and arrest people they suspect are in the country illegally.

The change moves the government away from an approach to immigration enforcement that has been popular among some law enforcement agencies but has drawn fire from civil rights groups, who…

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Judge Rules South Carolina Police Can Check People’s Immigration Status

robertsjohnson:

When roughly seventy percent of Latino Americans voted for Barack Obama the president made a big point of taking a stand on immigration reform. If immigrants wanted to become legal citizens why would it be a problem to show an officer a personal identification card to verify there actually a citizen? By passing a law giving law enforcement agents the ability to ask individuals for personal identification cards, it will reduce the amount of illegal immigrants while giving immigrants an incentive to become legal by applying for visas. We need a more effective internal force looking for illegal’s, the government is too small as it is to keep up with our borders yet alone every state in the country. This law upsets many people because people believe the government only has the authority to regulate citizenship.

Originally posted on CBS Charlotte:

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A federal judge has ruled that a South Carolina law allowing police to check people’s immigration status can go into effect during a lawsuit but kept in place a ban on other parts of the state’s tough new legislation.

In a ruling issued Thursday, U.S. District Judge Richard Gergel said that he would dissolve an earlier ruling that kept the contentious provision from going into effect. But Gergel also noted that both sides in an ongoing lawsuit over the issue will now have time to make further arguments in court.

Last year, the federal government and the American Civil Liberties Union sued to challenge the constitutionality of South Carolina’s new law, which was modeled on similar legislation in Arizona and considered among the toughest in the country.

Some parts of the law went into effect Jan. 1, including a requirement that businesses check new hires’ legal…

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The Economic Case For Immigration Reform

robertsjohnson:

Obama’s immigration reform policy has parts based on The Immigration Act of 1986. Where the policy plans to make a pathway for roughly 11 million illegal immigrants to become American citizens. If this reform happens immigrants will have a reason to tell their employers to increase their pay therefore increasing their annual earnings. This could affect companies in two ways, for one it could benefit companies with a lower percentage of illegal immigrants because a major wage rate increase wouldn’t occur. Putting more money into people pocket and having cash flow instead of sitting and losing value. However for a company with a high percentage of illegal immigrants would have to amount to a larger change. Companies might have to layoff workers. Another issue that should be address is the security of our borders. Close to have of the illegal’s coming into the country annually are coming over the border. Visas should also be centered on working in different industries and attending school in specializations and trade.

Originally posted on elmsprogressivemedia:

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  • 16 Nov 2012 06:09 PM

    The Economic Case For Immigration Reform


    At this week’s presser, Obama said he wanted to introduce immigration reform “very soon after [his] inauguration.” Julia Preston sums up the president’s plan:

    Mr. Obama made clear he intends to push for broad-scope legislation that would include a program to give legal status to an estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the country…. Mr. Obama said he also wanted to strengthen border security, punish employers who systematically hire unauthorized workers, and make visas available for farm workers and immigrants working in science and technology. 

    The above chart is from a 2010 Center for American Progress report (pdf) that projects immigration reform could add a potential $1.5 trillion to the US GDP over 10 years. Jordan Weissmann unpacks it:

    [The report's] calculations are based partly on the impact of the Reagan administration’s 1986 immigration reforms, which gave…

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